Office And Administrative Support Occupations Make Up Nearly 16 Percent Of U.S. Employment, May 2013

April 11, 2014

Via: U.S. Bureau of Labor Statistics

In May 2013, office and administrative support was the largest occupational group, making up nearly 16 percent of total U.S. employment. The next largest groups were sales and related occupations and food preparation and serving related occupations, which made up about 11 and 9 percent, respectively. Seven of the 10 largest occupations were in one of these three groups.


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The smallest occupational groups included legal occupations and life, physical, and social science occupations, each making up less than 1 percent of total employment in May 2013.

The highest-paying occupational groups were management, legal, computer and mathematical, and architecture and engineering occupations. Most detailed occupations in these groups were also high paying. For example, all 19 computer and mathematical occupations had average wages above the U.S. all-occupations mean of $46,440, ranging from $50,450 for computer user support specialists to $109,260 for computer and information research scientists.

The lowest-paying occupational groups were food preparation and serving related; farming, fishing, and forestry; personal care and service; building and grounds cleaning and maintenance; and healthcare support occupations. Annual mean wages for these groups ranged from $21,580 for food preparation and serving related occupations to $28,300 for healthcare support occupations. With few exceptions, the detailed occupations in these groups had below-average wages. For example, occupational therapy assistants and physical therapy assistants were the only healthcare support occupations with mean wages above the U.S. all-occupations mean.

Among 665,850 employed persons in the District of Columbia in May 2013, there were about 3,370 political scientists—accounting for 50.6 out of every 10,000 jobs in the District of Columbia. In all of the United States there were 5,570 political scientists employed out of a total of 132,588,810 employed people—meaning less than 1 (0.42) out of every 10,000 jobs in America were political scientists. The ratio that compares the concentration of employment in a defined area (in this case, the District of Columbia) to that of a larger area (the United States) is referred to by the Bureau of Labor Statistics as the “location quotient.”


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The location quotient of political scientists in the District of Columbia is 50.6 divided by 0.42 (the location quotient of political scientists in the United States), which equals about 120.5—indicating there are about 120.5 times as many political scientists per 10,000 total employed people in the District of Columbia as in the United States as a whole.

These data are from the Occupational Employment Statistics program. To learn more, see, “Occupational Employment and Wages — May 2013″ (HTML) (PDF), news release USDL-14-0528.

Interactive Map Detailing Growth Of Top Industries In 100 Most Populous U.S. Metros

February 13, 2014

By: Rob Sentz
Via: EMSI

Click here to see the interactive map

Which industries are the top drivers of job growth for each of the 100 largest U.S. markets? Which metros have added the most jobs post-recession? Which metros have the biggest concentration of jobs in healthcare, technology, construction, manufacturing, energy and other top fields?

The U.S. economy is composed of hundreds of industries that are spread across thousands of counties, and the interactions of these industries are huge engines for job formation and economic prosperity.

CareerBuilder and EMSI have teamed up to create a powerful interactive map that applies big data to visualize the enormous size, scope and diversity of the U.S. economy. The map uses EMSI’s rich labor market database of over 90 national and state employment resources to identify key industries that are driving job growth for the 100 most populous U.S. metros. 1

Viewers can click on each metro and the map reveals 10 of the most important detailed industries for that location, based on number of 2013 jobs, job growth since 2010 and job concentration. From well-known economic forces (e.g., finance in New York City and aerospace products and parts manufacturing in Seattle) to emerging sectors (e.g., motor vehicle body and trailer manufacturing in Nashville and data processing and hosting in San Antonio), the map provides comprehensive – and often surprising – insights.

Viewers can also click on an industry menu to see a list of metros where a specific industry is a major economic driver.

“Since 2010, the national workforce has grown four percent, but more than 40 large metros have eclipsed the national growth rate,” said Matt Ferguson, CEO of CareerBuilder. “These are metros with a strong concentration of computer systems design, software publishing and data processing and hosting firms. These are metros benefiting from the resurgence in U.S. manufacturing, and the nation’s need to find new energy sources and expand healthcare services.”

In a separate study of the same 100 metros, CareerBuilder and EMSI discovered which metros have added the most jobs per capita post-recession:

METROS WITH THE MOST JOBS ADDED PER CAPITA SINCE 2010


1. Salt Lake City, UT – added over 62,000 jobs since 2010, up 9% (534 new jobs per 10,000 people)

Originally a farming community, Salt Lake City has grown into an industrial center for the state. Industries that have experienced strong job growth in this metro include electronic shopping and mail order houses (up 43%), software publishing (up 28%), specialized freight trucking (up 23%) and credit intermediation (up 22%).

2. Grand Rapids-Wyoming, MI – added over 39,000 jobs since 2010, up 10% (513 new jobs per 10,000 people)

This manufacturing heavyweight has benefited from the rebound of production jobs after the recession. The metro saw job increases in various manufacturing segments such as plastics product (up 35%), motor vehicle parts (up 33%), metalworking machinery (up 30%) and office furniture (up 12%). Hospitals also accounted for an upswing in jobs (up 16%).

3. San Jose-Sunnyvale-Santa Clara, CA – added over 91,000 jobs since 2010, up 10% (498 new jobs per 10,000 people)

It’s no surprise that software publishing (up 30%), computer systems design (up 19%), data processing and hosting (up 16%), computer manufacturing (up 12%) and scientific research (up 9%) are big contributors to employment for this Silicon Valley metro.

4. Austin-Round Rock- San Marcos, TX – added over 90,000 jobs since 2010, up 11% (488 new jobs per 10,000 people)

Austin has made a name for itself as a technology and business hub, fueling job growth in management, scientific and consulting services (up 35%), computer systems design (up 35%), data processing and hosting (up 35%) and semiconductor manufacturing (up 17%).

5. Houston-Sugar Land-Baytown, TX – added over 281,000 jobs since 2010, up 10% (451 new jobs per 10,000 people)

Energy-rich Houston continues to see job growth in utility system construction (specifically, oil and gas pipeline, up 45%), mining support (up 38%), metal and mineral (except petroleum) wholesalers (up 31%), oil and gas extraction (up 25%), and architectural and engineering services (21%).

6. Nashville-Davidson-Murfreesboro-Franklin, TN – added over 71,000 jobs since 2010, up 9% (432 new jobs per 10,000 people)

A popular music center, Nashville saw a 25% increase in jobs for independent artists, writers and performers. The metro also saw notable jumps in jobs for motor vehicle manufacturing (up 61%), accounting services (up 37%), general freight trucking (up 17%) and specialty hospitals (up 15%).

7. Provo-Orem, UT – added over 24,000 jobs since 2010, up 12% (427 new jobs per 10,000 people)

The mid-sized Utah metro is well concentrated in a number of fast-growing tech industries: software publishing (up 51%), computer systems design (up 30%) and semiconductor manufacturing (up 14%).

8. Dallas-Fort Worth-Arlington, TX – added over 267,000 jobs since 2010, up 9% (400 new jobs per 10,000 people)

Part of the Silicon Prairie, Dallas saw a boost in jobs in computer systems design (up 32%) and communications equipment manufacturing (up 18%). Other key growth areas include oil and gas extraction (up 27%), office administration (up 22%) and credit intermediation (up 13%).

9. Bakersfield-Delano, CA – added 33,000 jobs since 2010, up 11% (394 new jobs per 10,000 people)

Growth in this metro has been fueled by agriculture-related industries such as crop production (up 14%) and dairy product manufacturing (up 11%). Bakersfield has also benefited from an upswing in utility system construction (specifically, oil and gas pipeline), an industry that has more than doubled in employment since 2010 and is nearly seven times as concentrated in Bakersfield than the national average.

10. Charlotte-Gastonia-Rock Hill, NC-SC – added over 70,000 jobs, up 8% (381 new jobs per 10,000 people)

In addition to spectator sports (up 37%), this metro also experienced growth in tech-related industries such as telecommunication carriers (up 31%), management, scientific and consulting services (up 22%), scheduled air transportation (up 17%) and data processing and hosting (up 14%).

Meanwhile, the poorest-performing labor markets are in Scranton–Wilkes-Barre and Albuquerque, both of which have roughly the same number of workers today as they did in 2010. Ten other metros, headlined by Providence, Dayton, and Syracuse, have only grown 1 percent.

The map also reveals pockets of the U.S. where key industries are clustered among the largest cities:

Motor vehicles parts manufacturing has traditionally been focused in Rust Belt cities, but Southern metros such as Birmingham, Louisville and Nashville are emerging in this sector.

Oil and gas extraction is a major driver of high-wage job growth in Texas, Oklahoma and the surrounding region. It’s also becoming a driver of job growth in Denver.

General freight trucking is concentrated in the Mid-Atlantic and Southeast (Nashville, Memphis, Jacksonville, etc.), where transportation routes are plentiful and huge population centers are in close range.

Software publishing has a big presence in Silicon Valley, but is also growing in major markets such as Seattle, Boston, Atlanta and Denver.

General medical and surgical hospitals are driving jobs in Columbus, Chicago, Baltimore, Boston, Rochester and St. Louis, among others.

Highway, street and bridge construction has seen an uptick in jobs in Baton Rouge, Oklahoma City and San Antonio as cities rebuild after natural disasters and address other public concerns.


CareerBuilder and EMSI are national leaders in providing labor market data and tools to dig deeper and better understand national and local economies.

1 EMSI data is collected from more than 90 federal and state sources, such as the U.S. Bureau of Labor Statistics, the U.S. Census Bureau, and state labor departments. EMSI removes suppressions often found in publicly available data and includes proprietors, creating a complete picture of the workforce.

About EMSI

Economic Modeling Specialists Intl., a CareerBuilder company, turns labor market data into useful information that helps organizations understand the connection between economies, people, and work. Using sound economic principles and good data, we build user-friendly services that help educational institutions, workforce planners, and regional developers build a better workforce and improve the economic conditions in their regions. For more information, visit www.economicmodeling.com.

About CareerBuilder®

CareerBuilder is the global leader in human capital solutions, helping companies target and attract great talent. Its online career site, CareerBuilder.com®, is the largest in the United States with more than 24 million unique visitors, 1 million jobs and 50 million resumes. CareerBuilder works with the world’s top employers, providing resources for everything from employment branding and talent and compensation intelligence to recruitment solutions. More than 10,000 websites, including 140 newspapers and broadband portals such as MSN and AOL, feature CareerBuilder’s proprietary job search technology on their career sites. Owned by Gannett Co., Inc. (NYSE:GCI), Tribune Company and The McClatchy Company (NYSE:MNI), CareerBuilder and its subsidiaries operate in the United States, Europe, South America, Canada and Asia. For more information, visit www.careerbuilder.com.

A Nation of Wineries

July 10, 2013

By: By KEVIN SCHAUL, TIM WALLACE and ADRIENNE CARTER
Via: The New York Times

Wine regions have been developing across the country, as diverse landscapes and weather patterns allow states to grow a variety of grapes. Related article . . .


Michigan | More Than Juice

ECONOMIC IMPACT $800 million
TOP VARIETALS Riesling, gewürztraminer, pinot gris

Michigan has 15,000 acres devoted to grapes, but largely the Concord and Niagara varieties used to make juice, jams and jellies. Many recent plantings have been for European grape varieties, vitis vinifera, to support the growing wine industry.

In 1974, Edward O’Keefe helped introduce vinifera grapes to Michigan, establishing Chateau Grand Traverse on Old Mission Peninsula.

Virginia | From Tobacco to Wine

ECONOMIC IMPACT $750 million
TOP VARIETALS Merlot, cabernet franc, viognier

Virginia’s early winemaking endeavors ended largely in failure, including the grape-growing efforts of Thomas Jefferson. After the passage of the Virginia Farm Winery Act in 1980, the industry started to gain traction and is now one of the fastest-growing segments of agriculture. It has helped reshape the agriculture business in a state dominated by livestock and field crops.

One of the oldest wineries, Barboursville Vineyards, was founded by the Zonin family, which now owns one of the largest private winemaking companies in Italy. Under the watch of its winemaker, Luca Paschina, Barboursville sells more than 38,000 cases a year; its Octagon 2008 retails for nearly $50.

Texas | Wine vs. Weather

ECONOMIC IMPACT $1.8 billion
TOP VARIETALS Black Spanish, sangiovese, tempranillo

In an area known for bulls and brisket, wine is a challenging business. Vineyards face disease, pests and a tumultuous growing season with hail, drought, thunderstorms and frost. In a tough year, some vintners have to buy grapes to ensure they can make wine.

In one of the earliest ventures, the cattle rancher Ed Auler and his wife, Susan, started Fall Creek Vineyards in 1975. Fall Creek is in Texas Hill Country, which has more than 20 percent of the state’s wineries.

New York | The Big Grape

ECONOMIC IMPACT $3.8 billion
TOP VARIETALS Riesling, gewürztraminer, cabernet franc

In the 1950s, Konstantin Frank, a professor of plant sciences from Ukraine, helped establish the Finger Lakes wine region by proving that vitis vinifera could thrive in the cold climate. While wineries are scattered across the state, the Finger Lakes accounts for more than a quarter of the total.

Hermann J. Wiemer, whose family produced wine in Germany for more than 300 years, moved to the Finger Lakes region in the 1960s. Mr. Wiemer focused, in part, on riesling, helping to establish it as one of most notable varietals in the state.

Oregon | Grass-Roots Growers

ECONOMIC IMPACT $2.7 billion
TOP VARIETALS Pinot noir, pinot gris

As land prices rose in California in the 1960s, Oregon had an influx of winemakers. Many trained at the viticulture and enology department at the University of California, Davis. Willamette Valley, near the Cascades, is the state’s largest wine-producing region, focusing on pinot noir, pinot gris and other grape varieties that do well in its climate.

Although it is one of the largest producers in Oregon, Erath Winery, founded by the Davis alumus Dick Erath, still doesn’t compare in size to its big California brethren. Last year, Erath sold 150,000 cases.

California | World Champion

ECONOMIC IMPACT $62 billion
TOP VARIETALS Chardonnay, cabernet sauvignon
When Prohibition ended in 1933, California’s wine industry, which traces its roots to Franciscan missionaries in the late 18th century, bounced back relatively quickly. In 1968, the state had more than 230 wineries.

California gained international recognition after the Judgment of Paris in 1976, a blind tasting that surprised the world when two of the state’s wines — Chateau Montelena Chardonnay 1973 and Stag’s Leap Wine Cellars Cabernet Sauvignon 1973 — beat their French counterparts. Now, California accounts for 90 percent of the country’s production, selling $22 billion annually in the United States.

E. & J. Gallo Winery, one of the largest wineries in the world, owns more than 16,000 acres in California, more than four times the acreage for vineyards in all of Virginia.

Grocery Store Geography

July 2, 2013

By: Nathan Yau
Via: Flowing Data


I’ve been poking around grocery store locations, courtesy of AggData, the past few days.

There’s a grocery store just about everywhere you go in the United States, because, well, we gotta eat. They look similar in that they sell produce on one side, meat in the back, and snacks and soda on the side opposite the produce. Magazines and small candies are carefully situated at eye-level by the cash registers. There’s usually a deli counter and prepared foods near the bread section. And yet, despite the generic format and layout, these stores can remind us of places and specific periods of our lives.

When I was a kid, I’d go to Save Mart and you’d get hit with the aroma of cupcakes and fresh bread from the bakery right at the entrance. They had cake samples at the counter, which was too high for me to reach, so my mom would grab me a piece. I totally get the “like a fat kid loves cake” line.

In college, I went to Safeway, and they had this magical barrier around the parking lot that prevented carts from rolling away and to deter people from stealing them. There always seemed to be homeless guy grasping a bottle held in a paper bag. It was probably milk. Two 12-packs of soda for five bucks? Yes, please.

When I was in Buffalo, I went to Wegmans. Somehow it was busy almost any time I went but the lines were almost always short. They had good, inexpensive grapefruit juice.

Then there’s the Targets and Walmarts, which are ubiquitous and seem to remind you of everywhere and nowhere at the same time.

It’s fun to poke around at these memories. What do your grocery stores remind you of?

The maps above show grocery stores with at least two hundred locations in the United States. I used a dissimilarity index and k-means for categorization, which popped out geographic distributions more or less. More to come.

Housing’s Rise and Fall in 20 Cities

June 26, 2013

By: Shan Carter and Kevin Quealy
Via: The New York Times & Flowing Data

Shan Carter and Kevin Quealy for The New York Times updated their housing prices graphic from a couple of years ago.


Behind the data

The Standard & Poor’s Case-Shiller Home Price Index for 20 major metropolitan areas is one of the most closely watched gauges of the housing market. The figures for April were released June 25. Figures shown here are not seasonally adjusted or adjusted for inflation.

The Hidden STEM Economy: Key Findings

June 20, 2013

By: Jonathan Rothwell
Via: Brookings

Workers in STEM (science, technology, engineering, and math) fields play a direct role in driving economic growth. Yet, because of how the STEM economy has been defined, policymakers have mainly focused on supporting workers with at least a bachelor’s (BA) degree, overlooking a strong potential workforce of those with less than a BA. A new report from the Brookings Metropolitan Policy Program presents a new and more rigorous way to define STEM occupations, and in doing so presents a new portrait of the STEM economy.


Graphics by Christopher Ingraham
Sources: Based on Brookings analysis of data from the Department of Labor’s O*NET program, the Bureau of Labor Statistics, the American Community Survey and the Strumsky Patents Database.