Why Jon Roberts Is Qualified To Explain The 2014 World Cup

June 9, 2014

Jon Roberts is a principal with TIP Strategies in Austin, Texas. He has authored two posts in celebration of the upcoming 2014 World Cup. Jon shares his views on the economics surrounding the World Cup in his post, Economics of the World Cup. He discusses his predictions in The 2014 World Cup: The Lessons of Geography and History.
If you ask what qualifies him to write about the economics of sports or to predict the outcome of the World Cup, here is his answer:

Regarding the World Cup, no one is “qualified” to make predictions. Of course that doesn’t stop anybody, least of all me. I have, however, been an enthusiastic follower of the game for as long as I can remember. I grew up in Germany, with a grandfather who was a national caliber player and who taught me the game. I can remember Pele’s debut in the 1958 World Cup in Sweden. It was a revelation. More painfully, I remember Germany’s loss to England in 1966. I’ve watched that game many times since. England was given a goal, despite the ball not having crossed the goal line. But, hey, I’m over it now. Really.
The economics of sports is something I came to appreciate in the mid and late 90s. I led an economic impact study of the Texas Motor Speedway and then became an expert witness in the subsequent lawsuit on behalf of the Northwest ISD (outside of Fort Worth). Since then, the question of public subsidies for sports facilities has arisen with some regularity. Credible studies by economists of all stripes have cast grave doubt on the benefits associated with incentives for sports in general.

Jon Roberts has authored two posts in celebration of the upcoming 2014 World Cup. Jon shares his views on the economics surrounding the World Cup in his post, Economics of the 2014 World Cup. He discusses his predictions in the post, The 2014 World Cup: The Lessons of Geography and History.